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Another busy day. Huggy girl Farrah had a stroke-like episode and has been very weak for several days. Thankfully she’s slowly getting stronger. Adding daily 50 ml. lactated ringer’s solution sub-q to her meds. ๐Ÿ’–๐Ÿˆ‍โฌ›

Dr. Thomas had Lizzie’s X-rays reviewed, and the radiologist said she thought maybe there was a bladder stone in there. Sure enough, I turned Lizzie over and there was a lump in her urethra that wasn’t there before, and I was able to ease a stone out. She’s acting much more normally now, and we are super happy to see her bouncing back. ๐Ÿ’–๐Ÿน

Fluffy had another wound cAnimal Cancer Centerchange at the Animal Cancer Center. Progress is slow, and Fluffy is pretty much done with humans with syringes and scissors. She settles down at home however, and we work to keep her quality of life good with love and tasty treats. ๐Ÿ’–๐Ÿˆ
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They’re getting such wonderful care

5 days ago
Friendly Farms - A Small Animal Sanctuary

Tuesday, vet day. Mocha has a sebaceous cyst on her belly that burst. Dr. Thomas prescribed an antibiotic.

Lizzie has some crusty skin, and her appetite is poor. She had a Vitamin C shot and we’ll try an antibiotic, syringe feeding, and extra Vitamin C. She also has an ovarian cyst. RVT Gaby took X-rays, but nothing unusual found there. If no improvement, we’ll recheck in a week and discuss a skin biopsy or cyst removal depending on how she presents.

Sparkle is walking funny. Dr. Thomas thinks it’s a disc issue and prescribed an anti inflammatory.

Jasmine has been snuffly lately. Since there isn’t discharge and her lungs are clear, no treatment at this time.

Your support allows us to provide medical care to our animals. Donate to the Friendly Farms Medical Fund at the Avian and Exotic Clinic of Monterey by calling 831-647-1147. Thank you!

๐Ÿ’–๐Ÿน๐Ÿฐ๐Ÿ’–
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I’m so pleased they all got on ok

Thanks for all you do! ๐Ÿ’ž

“Stop right there and hand over some snac.” Nutella ๐ŸŒฐ ... See MoreSee Less

โ€œStop right there and hand over some snac.โ€ Nutella ๐ŸŒฐ

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Lol, I hope you got a treat

Nutella has become a pro with the morning and evening supplemental feedings. The hoom needs a little practice though. ๐Ÿ’–๐Ÿน ... See MoreSee Less

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Thank you!! โค

Aww, that’s beautiful

Donโ€™t believe everything you hare: despite the name, black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) are actually hares, not rabbits! Some key differences between rabbits and hares are their size and how they care (or donโ€™t care) for their young. Hares are much larger than rabbits and have longer ears. In fact, their large ears not only help with hearing but also help them keep cool in hot arid environments. Hares also spend more time above ground and use their long legs to run away from predators as opposed to escaping into underground burrows. And, unlike rabbits, hares do not spend a lot of time with their young once they are born. In fact, hares are a precocial species โ€“ their young are born fully furred and their eyes open, ready to feed and fend for themselves almost immediately after birth.

Black-tailed jackrabbits are commonly found throughout California. Other hares in the state include the snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) and the white-tailed jackrabbit (Lepus townsendii). However, these other species are less commonly found in California. All hares are herbivores and eat a variety of plants. Like their lagomorph relatives, rabbits and pikas, hares are coprophagic, meaning they digest their food twice by eating their own pellets (donโ€™t try that at home).

Unfortunately, black-tailed jackrabbits face a number of conservation challenges, including disease. The recent emergence of a highly contagious viral pathogen, rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV2) is shown to be lethal to hares and rabbits โ€“ both wild and domestic. The disease was first detected in California in the wild in a population of black-tailed jackrabbits in Riverside County in May of 2020. Since then, the virus has spread to 11 counties throughout California. RHDV2 does not infect humans or other animals. To learn more about RHDV2, including how to report sick or dead hares or rabbits, please visit CDFWโ€™s RHDV2 webpage:

wildlife.ca.gov/Conservation/Laboratories/Wildlife-Health/Monitoring#55671861-rabbit-hemorrhagic-...

#WildlifeWednesday
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Thank you. So interesting!

We have one on our street that chases us and our dogs back in our houses at night. He’s made the neighborhood watch page. ๐Ÿ˜…

2 weeks ago
Friendly Farms - A Small Animal Sanctuary

๐ŸšจWarning: graphic photo. ๐Ÿšจ

Good news! โœจ Dr. Arteaga found more healthy tissue growing in Fluffy’s wound site. Progress is slow, but we are so happy to be moving forward! Her weight was up again as well. ๐Ÿฅณ

Recheck on Friday. ๐Ÿ’–๐Ÿˆ
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That’s great news, I’m so pleased

Please join us in welcoming Mocha and Honey! These delightful girls appear to be about 1 1/2 years old, and will be available for adoption soon. ๐Ÿ’–๐Ÿน ... See MoreSee Less

Please join us in welcoming Mocha and Honey! These delightful girls appear to be about 1 1/2 years old, and will be available for adoption soon. ๐Ÿ’–๐Ÿน

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They’re so beautiful

Emmaline comes up the hill to see if we forgot and left the cat food out. Not today, chicky girl. ๐Ÿ’–๐Ÿ“ ... See MoreSee Less

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Lol, worth a look

Adorable Mr. Gusgus has spread his angel wings and flown away. ๐ŸŒˆ He was a cheerful guy with a great attitude about life.

Spunky to the end, even when he was relying on us for syringe feeding for a good portion of his calories, he would chatter if he thought we were taking too long to give him his food. ๐Ÿ‘‘

Gusgus was very patient through all of the boar sac cleanings, baths, and meds. As is typical of any of us who live to a great age, he was plagued from time to time with maladies such as ear infections, diarrhea and dry eye. Every time we thought that maybe his time was up, he’d pull through and we’d once again settle into our peaceful routine of cleaning, feeding and cuddles. He was a real joy. ๐Ÿ’–๐Ÿน
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I’m so sorry to hear that. I’ve enjoyed following his story. RIP beautiful little Gusgus. Thinking of you

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